fbpx

  
  
  • An incredible session from the legendary Tribe Records scene — an equal effort from leader Doug Hammond and keyboardist David Durrah, who contributes some ground breaking Fender Rhodes and moog work to the set! Hammond handles drums plus a bit of vocals and synthesizer on the session — working alongside Durrah in a groove that...
  • Out of stock
    Jim Hall's Concierto was arguably the greatest LP in the history of CTI and possibly a masterpiece With two legendary players in the frontline, trumpeter Chet Baker and Paul Desmond, Hall interprets standards and engaging originals A master of melody who never wastes notes, the centerpiece for this release is Hall's interpretation...
  • Out of stock
    Stanley Turrentine, the jazz tenor saxophone player, was also known to some as "Mr T" or "The Sugar Man" The jazz musician was greatly influenced at a young age by family and others, having been invited to sit in with Illinois Jacquet at the tender age of 12 Turrentine's only formal musical training came from a stint in the...
  • Out of stock
    Daddy Plays the Horn is a 1955 jazz album by saxophonist Dexter Gordon, originally released on Bethlehem Records “There’s a clear focus on getting Gordon back in the spotlight on this record, as the basic set up for each song is to feature his solos heavily The structures and tempos don’t exactly catch you off guard, but...
  • Out of stock
    Adele Sebastian was an Afro American jazz flutist and singer, active from the early 70s  (when she was still a teenager) until her untimely death at the age of 27 (!) in 1983 from a kidney failure In fact she had been depending on monthly dialysis to stay alive for years She lived through and for the music and you can hear it on...
  • Out of stock
    An amazing session of spiritual soul jazz – and one of the rarest albums on Strata East! Shamek Farrah’s soulful alto is matched with the free spiritual piano of Sonelius Smith, for a totally memorable session that virtually defines the essence of the Strata-East sound! The music is free, but not too free; lyrical, but...
  • Out of stock
    Having sponsored Ornette Coleman at the School of Jazz near Lennox, MA, pianist and composer John Lewis helped launch the controversial career of one of the last great innovators in jazz Lewis' support of the ragtag Texas native was somewhat unique in jazz circles at the time and even surprising, especially considering the gulf...
  • Out of stock
    When this set was recorded in 1964, pianist Randy Weston had no luck interesting any label to release the music, so he came out with it independently on his tiny Bakton company & then in 1972 Atlantic released the performances It is surprising that no company in the mid-1960s signed Weston up because "Willie's Tune" from the...
  • The best R&B songwriter and soul singer that most people have never heard of, Sam Dees has written songs for countless artists, including Gladys Knight, Aretha Franklin, Whitney Houston, George Benson, the Temptations, Teddy Pendergrass, Millie Jackson, Jackie Wilson, the Manhattans, Regina Belle, KC & the Sunshine Band,...
  • Out of stock
    With his big, powerful voice and fervent but controlled emotionality, Solomon Burke was one of the early pioneers of soul music, though his contributions were not fully recognized until the new millennium, when he belatedly won his first Grammy By the age of nine, Solomon Burke (b March 21, 1940, Philadelphia, PA) was a preacher...
  • This set came about, in part, as a result of Ellington's signing to Frank Sinatra's Reprise label in November 1962, with the ending of his exclusive contract to Columbia Six numbers from the three Paris dates were initially edited and released by Reprise as part of the ten-song Duke Ellington's Greatest Hits, but the bulk of the...
  • Out of stock
    Champion Jack Dupree was a New Orleans bred boogie-woogie piano player But boogie-woogie piano music has little or no collector value The same cannot be said for Dupree Lps, which have always fetched healthy good prices in record bin and on ebay While you can’t give away LPs from such accomplished boogie-woogie piano players...
  • I bought this LP, of the Atlanta concert, in 1960 It knocked me out then, and it knocks me out now For me, this IS Ray Charles In the intro to 'Night Time is the Right Time' Ray says, 'and Miss Marjorie Hendricks will help us out on vocals', and boy, does she help out! Turn up the volume and strap yourself down The greatness of...
  • Out of stock
    Alan Bates took Thelonious Monk into the studio for his first trio recording in fifteen years with his old sidekick Art Blakey It has been said often enough that Blakey is the ideal drummer for Monk, and one has only to hear them together again after all this time to realize the truth of the statement If Blakey at times seems to...
  • Out of stock
    During the sixties there was the British Blues boom, containing many blues bands, one of the fineat being Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac In January of 1969 Fleetwood Mac were at Chess Studios, Chicago, Jamming with the likes of Willie Dixson, SP Leary, Honeyboy Edwards, JT Brown and longtime Muddy Waters pianist Otist Spann The end...
  • Out of stock
    Another absolute gem from Alan Bates’s Candid label this must be probably Otis Spann's finest piece of work on wax He may not have been the blues, but he was sure close to being the blues pianist Spann provided wonderful, imaginative, tasty piano solos and better-than-average vocals, and was arguably the best player whose style...
  • Out of stock
    One of the great soprano saxophonists of all time (ranking up there with Sidney Bechet and John Coltrane), Steve Lacy's career was fascinating to watch develop He originally doubled on clarinet and soprano (dropping the former by the mid-'50s), inspired by Bechet, and played Dixieland in New York with Rex Stewart, Cecil Scott,...
  • Out of stock
    Possessor of the happiest sound in jazz, flügelhornist Clark Terry always plays music that is exuberant, swinging, and fun A brilliant (and very distinctive) soloist, he gained early experience playing trumpet in the viable St Louis jazz scene of the early '40s (where he was an inspiration for Miles Davis) and, after performing...
  • Out of stock
    Lightnin’ Hopkins was one of the most over-recorded artists in the blues genre The recordings here were made at a pivotal moment in his career In 1960, at 48 years old, he was no longer a star in the black community, but was becoming a folk legend His deeply personal music not only reflected the experiences of his community but...
  • Out of stock
    For the most part, this is a 1961 session wherein the blues raconteur and pianist Memphis Slim runs through a good chunk of his repertoire, the songs that came to mind that afternoon As such, it’s relaxed entertainment, rather than a fixed recording for a larger audience Which is not to say an audience can’t enjoy this music...
  • Out of stock
    Booker Little was the first trumpet soloist to emerge in jazz after the death of Clifford Brown to have his own sound His tragically brief life (he died at age 23 later in 1961) cut short what would have certainly been a major career This is supremely soulful modern jazz and one of his best albums ever as a leader The album's got...
  • Out of stock
    Freddie Hubbard was one of the most prolific jazz trumpeters in the business He played a hot and sassy horn! When he was teamed up with George Benson, Jack DeJohnette and Ron Carter (just to name a few) on this one of many Creed Taylor-produced collaborations, he most deservedly won the Grammy! The opening title song "First...
  • Flugelhornist Art Farmer and guitarist Jim Hall had had a regular group for a time in the mid-'60s but (except for one occasion) had not played together since, until this 1978 LP This is an unusual effort for CTI in that it is a quintet set without added horns, strings or keyboards Farmer and Hall are joined by vibraphonist Mike...
  • Out of stock
    Electric blues guitarist Melvin Taylor had been sporadically recording solo albums for 20 years when Dirty Pool arrived — and was somehow just beginning to find fame Already a hit in Europe, it had taken a steady run of performing in Chicago’s famed blues clubs to slowly earn Taylor a well-deserved reputation as an equal...
  • A rare 1964 American live performance by Ben Webster gets a vinyl upgrade from Pure Pleasure RecordsKansas City native Ben Webster had a varied music training Before becoming an elite tenor saxophonist, he trained on violin and piano In his early career, he played in bands led by Lester Young, Count Basie, Cab Calloway, Fletcher...
  • Out of stock
    This is the first of two superb albums recorded by Bill Evans, and guitarist Jim Hall, and it was recorded over two sessions in April and May 1962 Arrangements simply for piano and guitar are rare in Jazz, and it is even more seldom that the results are truly inspiring and as musically worthwhile as in this case It is usual for...
  • Feel Good, not Superfly, is the sound of early-'70s pimping -- even when the tempo slows down, which happens rarely, it's for a slow blues grind, not a ballad, and songs like Tina's "Kay Got Laid (Joe Got Paid)" make no apologies for mythologizing pimps This results in a supremely sleazy, utterly addictive record, one that's...
  • Outside there was the rain and the bone-freezing chill of November in Manchester, England Inside the concert hall it was warm and it was beautiful Duke was alive and well, and his orchestra was playing with all the flaring genius that has entranced us since first this musical miracle of our century found his vocation of...
  • Out of stock
    Originally released on Warners Brothers to scant acclaim in 1978, this Jerry Wexler-produced masterpiece finds James in astounding voice with a batch of great material to apply her massive interpretive powers to The band, including the cream of the late-'70s Los Angeles session hot-shots (Cornell Dupree, Jeff Porcaro, Chuck...
  • Out of stock
    Mal Waldron's first tribute to Billie Holiday, titled Left Alone, was recorded in 1959, mere months before the singer's death He returned to salute the legendary vocalist on several occasions since then, with this recording likely being his final tribute, recorded less than a year before his own death Waldron, who worked with...
  • From its opening bars, with Bill Salter's bass and Rahsaan's flute passionately playing Bill Withers' "Ain't No Sunshine", you know this isn't an ordinary Kirk album (were any of them) As the string section, electric piano, percussion, and Cornel Dupree's guitar slip in the back door, one can feel the deep soul groove Kirk is...
  • Out of stock
    Recorded in 1963, The Sheriff features the Modern Jazz Quartet in fine swinging form The program is not as sharply focused as on some of the earlier Atlantic releases, but it is compelling nonetheless There are four originals by pianist John Lewis, including the fleeting, bluesy title cut, and the moody, spacious "In a Crowd" --...
  • With such a tight group as the MJQ is is impossible to single out individual musicians which probably accounts for their long lived success This is a strong recording from the Modern Jazz Quartet, with inventive versions of John Lewis' "Vendome," Ray Brown's "Pyramid," Jim Hall's "Romaine," and Lewis' famous "Django," along...
  • Out of stock
    Leadbelly's last recording sessions for a commercial record label, held in the early fall of 1944, yielded a dazzling 12 songs, embracing virtuoso guitar blues ("Grasshoppers In My Pillow"), pounding piano-driven scatting ("The Eagle Rocks", with Leadbelly himself at the ivories, a talent for which he wasn't usually recognized),...
  • Out of stock
    Happy Trails is the 1969 follow-up to Quicksilver Messenger Service's self-titled folk-rock inflected debut Largely recorded live in concert, the album opens with a 25 minute, six-part suite of Bo Diddley's "Who Do You Love" and is anchored with a version of his song "Mono" One of the first releases to successfully capture the San...
  • Out of stock
    Black, Brown, & Beige is Duke Ellington’s musical representation of the African American experience in the United States It is arguably The Maestro’s greatest work The triumph of telling so important a story so well through music alone makes Duke Ellington’s Black, Brown, & Beige a masterpiece Black, Brown, &...
  • Mingus Dynasty, like its predecessor and Columbia companion Mingus Ah Um, was recorded in 1959, a watershed year for the insuperable, eruptive bassist-composer Charles Mingus Leading what amounted to a repertory company comprising some of New York’s best and most creative improvisers, Mingus musically challenged two ensembles (a...
  • Out of stock
    "Criss-Cross" - Thelonious Monk's second album for Columbia Records – features some of the finest work that Monk ever did in the studio with his '60s trio and quartet Whether revisiting pop standards or reinventing Monk's own classic compositions, Monk and Charlie Rouse (tenor sax), John Ore (bass), and Frankie Dunlop (drums)...
  • Out of stock
    THouse’s recording session ran over a few days and saw the studio set up like a small club with an invited audience I remember John (Hammond) running around crazed, as was Son’s manager, Dick Waterman (a man to whom Son owed everything) Al Wilson of Canned Heat was sat alongside Son, and once the recording started occasionally...
  • Out of stock
    The arrangements by Tommy Newsom for strings, brass, and woodwinds may be a bit sweet and the 12 performances may be overly concise (often under three minutes), but the resulting music is strangely pleasing Acoustic guitarist Charlie Byrd always had a strong affinity for Brazilian jazz, and he sticks exclusively to Antonio Carlos...
  • Out of stock
    No introduction needed for this fabulous release Arguably one of the greatest blues recordingslaid down in the last 40 years! Just checking out the track listing and personnel says it all Originally released on Mike Vernon's highly collectable and revered Blue Horizon label in1969, this pressing will become a must for all serious...
  • Out of stock
    This music counts among Ellington’s most well-realized ‘concept projects’, all inspired by Shakespeare’s work and filled with memorable melodies and ample opportunities for solos by Cat Anderson, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, and Quentin Jackson The Ellington-Strayhorn compositions treat their soloists like actors...
  • Out of stock
    This is a reissue of a now out-of-print album from live trio date by the legendary LA-based pianist, composer and multi-bandleader, Horace Tapscott Pianist Horace Tapscott is always at his best when he is leading a trio Around 1977, Horace reorganized the Pan-Afrikan Peoples Arkestra with the help of several old friends and...
  • Out of stock
    Where have you gone, Charles Tolliver There was such promise in the concept of Music Inc, and in Strata East, but evidently, the music world’s attention was elsewhere and this tremendous live set was probably heard by only a few hundred sets of ears On the back of the record sleeve, Tolliver undersigned his mission statement:...
  • Out of stock
    Owning both this disc and Live at Slugs’, Volume 1 is essential for hardcore Jazz fans Part two of the Slugs’ date is just as impressive and again features three originals all penned by the group Here we get a better example of Tolliver’s compositional work with the touching Coltrane tribute Our Second Father Again...
  • An overlooked gem from west coast vibist Ricky Kelly – a player who only cut a small number of records, but who was kind of an 80s equivalent to some of the hippest Bobby Hutcherson work of the 70s! This album's a bit different than some of the more avant work on the Nimbus Records label – as Kelly plays with a warm modal vibe...
  • Out of stock
    The best of pianist Horace Tapscott’s recordings for the tiny Nimbus label is this 1981 LP which features him in a sextet with trumpeter Reggie Bullen, altoist Gary Bias, tenor saxophonist Sabir Matteen, bassist Roberto Miranda and drummer Everett Brown, Jr The group stretches out on a couple of Tapscott’s originals...

Title

Go to Top