Single’ isn’t just a reissue of Pub’s similarly-titled 2002 set, it properly rounds up the Glaswegian dub techno reductionist’s first three 12″s and adds a couple of vinyl exclusives. Long-form blunted dancefloor haziness never sounded so lovely: imagine Various Artists/T++, The Black Dog, BoC and Manuel Göttsching locked in a room wth some synths, drum machines and echo boxes.

Hot on the heels of last year’s much needed ‘Do You Ever Regret Pantomime?’ reissue comes this equally levitational set of Caledonian miasma, remastered at Berlin’s Dubplates & Mastering. It’s the best way to widen yer appreciation of the Ampoule boss’s early work, especially if you’ve only come across his debut album and the ‘Summer’ EP. ‘Single’ is basically a photo album of Pub’s earliest experiments, and kicks off fittingly with ‘Lunch’, from his 1999-released 12″ “Lick/Lunch”. When that record originally dropped, Pub was only 18 years old and was penning his extended dub-phoric jams on a single synthesizer/workstation.

The rudimentary DIY methodology adds to the raw emotionality of the material. It sounds as if Pub is very slowly conducting the loose, trance-influenced arpeggios and dusty rhythms and shifting them carefully in-and-out of frame on the fly almost like Manuel Göttsching on the Biblical “E2-E4”. There’s a physicality to the music that sounds alien in an era where DAWs are practically unavoidable, and it’s sobering to recall. ‘Springing Daisy’s’ is a truncated version of the “Springing Daisy’s Mix” of ‘Film’ (from 2002’s “Derail” 12″), turning up on “Single” again to close the collection, shortened from almost 15 minutes to 10 and aptly renamed ‘Short Film’.

Both versions center around Pub’s innate ability to take basic ingredients – in this case a single melodic loop and a distorted T++ style rhythm – and sublime them into gaseous traces of their constituent parts. ‘Springing Daisy’s’ is the “pop” version – short, sharp, beat heavy – and ‘Short Film’ (a vinyl exclusive) is the abstracted, Basic Channel-influenced inversion, detuning the melody and torching the rhythm into an acidic fizz. ‘Derail’ is included too, and has never sounded better, showcasing Pub at his most dissociated and melancholy with a distant BoC hum couched in a thick fog of reverberating resonance.

2003’s ‘Surgery’ rounds up the early run, and displays Pub’s artistic progression, moving a few steps out of the murk and allowing the drums to push into near-dancefloor territory on the title track. And the new edition is finished off with the trancey ‘Kamikazi’, a track from the original “> Single” that’s never made it to vinyl before.