Sundazed

The Five Americans “Progressions” (Sundazed)

2020-04-16T20:19:59+00:00April 16th, 2020|

The hits kept on coming from heroic Dallas fivesome The Five Americans with their third longplayer, 1967’s Progressions. Both “Zip Code” and “Evol-Not Love” careened up the charts as The Five Americans squared off on live stages throughout the Deep South with artists such as the Doors and Jefferson Airplane – and more than held their own against the best American rock ‘n’ roll had to offer!

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Various Artists “Garland Records: Pacific Northwest Jukebox” (Sundazed)

2020-03-27T02:29:27+00:00March 27th, 2020|

Rare and unissued Pacific Northwest floor fillers! While soul music might not be the first thing that comes to mind when you think of the music of the Pacific Northwest, Salem Oregon’s Garland Records was churning out high quality hip shakers along with their reels of garage & psych.

Contained here is some super deep ‘Northwestern Soul,’ including three cuts making their inaugural spins 50 years after they were put to tape.

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Primitive

2020-03-19T20:32:11+00:00March 12th, 2020|

 In Stock March 17, 2020

Gritty ’67 Garage Punk Perfection!

The complete known recorded work from dominant New York garage punks The Groupies! Includes their iconic and oft-covered nugget “Primitive,” its B side of equal swagger “I’m A Hog For You,” and a complete bombastic 1967 live show put to tape before the band imploded and microphone madman Cooker went to the pen!

Decades before it caught on as the empty boast of every eighties and nineties hair metal band, there was a group – or Groupies, as it were – who fully earned the title, “the bad boys of rock.” Rising from the gutters of New York, the Groupies rose to brief east coast notoriety in 1966, issuing the astounding “Primitive,” a loose rewrite of the Willie Dixon-Howlin’ Wolf blues standard “Spoonful,” rewritten in the Groupies’ own image.

On this occasion, the Groupies’ live set reads like a tribute to Chess Records, with an emphasis on Howlin’ Wolf and songwriter Willie Dixon. This blues material is all predictably intense, the same can be said for their cover of Ike & Tina Turner’s “It’s Gonna Work Out Fine.” With a nod to their British Invasion influences, also included are fervid covers of Them and the Kinks. While it may be a fool’s errand comparing a Kinks cover to the original, when “It’s Too Late” kicks into the chorus, watch out!

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Nancy Priddy “You’ve Come This Way Before” (Sundazed)

2020-03-13T20:34:40+00:00February 14th, 2020|

Released just a year after her vocals graced Leonard Cohen’s debut, Nancy Priddy’s lone album is a sweeping odyssey across avant garde arrangements rife with experimental pop instrumentation and adorned with her sublimely delivered psychedelic poetry. Previously unavailable on vinyl for over 50 years, it’s an unpredictable and kaleidoscopic trip.

Known more for her acting work (Bewitched, The Waltons, Matlock) and her parenting work (Christina Applegate), Nancy Priddy started out as a sixties Greenwich Village folkstress, initially as a member of The Bitter End Singers. She honed her chops contributing backing vocals (uncredited) to 1967’s Songs Of Leonard Cohen.

In ‘68 she released her lone opus You’ve Come This Way Before, produced by Phil Ramone, propelled by the Funky Drummer Bernard “Pretty” Purdie, and released by Dot Records. It’s a lush journey with a youthful tone reminiscent of Margo Guryan, but showing a wit that suggests she knows more than she’s letting on. All cuts are co-written by Nancy which speaks to its cohesion, as it’s truly a journey to be experienced in its entirety as it ventures into far corners of the musical spectrum, and with the help of Purdie they sew it into one delightful platter. Listentothis.info said of it, “A real powerhouse of a record. Good for fans of Honey Ltd., Dusty Springfield, Jefferson Airplane. Listen in headphones if you can.”

“Christina’s World,” one of the many stand out tracks, takes its name and inspiration from a painting by Andrew Wyeth. Not only did the painting inspire the song, but it also inspired the naming of Nancy’s daughter.

Possibly too wildly eclectic for the ears of 1968, or maybe too smart for the hippy dippy set, this treasure faded away into obscurity trading for hefty sums in collectors’ circles. In ‘69 Nancy was recruited by Mort Garson to contribute to his Songs of the Zodiac series. That would become her last musical endeavor before embarking on her acting career.

Modern Harmonic is proud to treat this treasure with the reverence it deserves. Mastered by Joe Lizzi, cut by Kevin Gray, and pressed by RTI. This first ever LP reissue is a true treat for ears and we’re ecstatic to share it with you!

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Various Artists “Shake What You Brought: Soul Treasures From The SSS International Label” (Sundazed)

2020-03-13T20:34:40+00:00February 14th, 2020|

Southern soul sizzlers from Nashville! Some serious swagger emerged on Shelby S. Singleton’s SSS International label, including the funk-soaked, Allen Toussaint-penned “There’s A Break In The Road,” Mickey Murray’s relentless “Sticky Sue,” Bettye LaVette’s standout revival of “Piece Of My Heart,” and more sensational workouts! Cut by Kevin Gray and pressed on gold vinyl at Third Man Pressing!

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Clear Light “Clear Light” (Sundazed)

2020-01-18T21:47:13+00:00January 18th, 2020|

The sole psychedelic ’67 testament by the LSD-inspired L.A. band is a frenzy of double drumming, serpentine acid guitar, crunchy fuzz bass, and carnival-clatter keyboards. Featuring the heavy-on-the-paranoia “Mr. Blue,” as well as a bonus track not included on the original LP, and pressed on clear vinyl!

The sole psychedelic ’67 testament by the LSD-inspired L.A. band is a frenzy of double drumming, serpentine acid guitar, crunchy fuzz bass, and carnival-clatter keyboards. Featuring the heavy-on-the-paranoia “Mr. Blue,” as well as a bonus track not included on the original LP, and pressed on clear vinyl! The lone release by Los Angeles’ Clear Light, a band that once seemed poised to step through the doors opened by labelmates the Doors, onto the wide-open FM playlists and from there to the top of the charts. Fate decreed otherwise, unfortunately, and Clear Light instead became the stuff that cults are made of. Though this album is their only recorded legacy, the music of Clear Light continues to shine.

Psychedelia runs amuck with twin drummers and creamy fuzz guitar. This reissue of their rare self-titled 1967 Elektra debut, produced by Paul Rothchild, features a non-LP bonus track (“She’s Ready To Be Free”) and liner notes that tell Clear Light’s story in full, vivid detail! As the original jacket states, “To fully appreciate the spectacular sound of double drumming in Clear Light, play this record at high volume.”

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Raymond Scott “The Jingle Workshop: Midcentury Musical Miniatures 1951-1965” (Sundazed)

2019-11-29T03:54:12+00:00November 29th, 2019|

Tingling tartness of jingle perfection! In addition to being a pioneer of early electronic music, Raymond Scott generated hymns to hunger, odes to pudding and pilsner, and crafted carols for countless other products, elevating the form of advertisement to an art.
If Zappa had written music for commercials, it’s not hard to think his approach would have been similar! This first ever collection is pressed on blue and gold vinyl at Third Man Pressing and contains varied styles in both instrumentation and vocalisation, previously unavailable electronic works, and a zine-style in-sert with rare photos and a reproduction of a 1964 interview with Raymond himself. Products may contain soy, wheat, dairy, or Mel Torme.

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Steppenwolf “Steppenwolf” (Sundazed)

2019-11-29T03:54:12+00:00November 29th, 2019|

Heavy Metal Thunder! You couldn’t go anywhere in the blazing summer of ‘68 without hearing “Born To Be Wild” blaring, and its inclusion in the iconic film Easy Rider the following year cemented it as a rallying cry for bikers and countless other counterculture miscreants. On their debut album, Steppenwolf (fronted by John Kay’s menacing rasp) reach new levels of deafening heaviness, ripping through a set of originals and attitude-filled covers, simultaneously forging a name for the sounds of an emerging genre. Pressed at RTI on clear vinyl and packaged in an elaborate foil jacket, this is the first ever reissue of the highly-coveted mono version of the album.

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Freddy King “The Mojo! King Rarities and Obscurities” (Sundazed)

2019-11-29T03:54:12+00:00November 29th, 2019|

Blues master Freddy King made history with his explosive and unconventional guitar style, his immortal instrumentals inspiring axemen both at home and abroad.
The Mojo! showcases Freddy’s fusion of traditional blues with a contemporary edge across a blazing set of originally unissued alternate takes and rarities from the King Records era and beyond, all 14 of which making their first-ever appear-ance on LP! Pressed on gold vinyl at RTI!

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Various Artists “More Oar- A Tribute To The Skip Spence Album” (Sundazed)

2019-11-29T03:54:12+00:00November 29th, 2019|

Plant, Beck, Waits, Skip! Celebrating its 20th anniversary, Modern Harmonic presents the first ever vinyl edition of More Oar‘ A Tribute To The Skip Spence Album.
In addition to the full album’which features covers from Robert Plant, Beck, Mudhoney, Tom Waits, and others this edition features the wild skeletal recording of ‘Little Hands’ by The Flaming Lips that was originally intended as a collaboration with Robert Plant. A double LP pressed at Third Man, this set also includes liner notes from the original album’s producer.

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Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels “Take A Ride” (Sundazed)

2019-10-18T03:56:34+00:00October 18th, 2019|

Motor City legends Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels set unsurpassed standards for balls-out American white-boy R&B. Under the aegis of crack producer Bob Crewe, the Wheels shot to fame, propelled by Ryder’s sweat-soaked soulful vocals, the piercing, mile-a-minute guitar sting of Jim McCarty, and the piledriver drum attack of Johnny Bee. Attacking rock and R&B with a startling, head-on frenzy, the group created a rock-n-soul dynasty still without equal.

Sundazed presents the High-Definition Vinyl debut of 1966’s Take A Ride… galvanizing mono, with the classic original album artwork faithfully reproduced, and pressed on gold vinyl!

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Rockin’ Ramrods “Rockin’ Ramrods” (Sundazed)

2019-09-20T04:22:42+00:00September 20th, 2019|

The perfect proto-punk blend of melody and aggression by The Rockin’ Ramrods put a stranglehold on the mid 60s Boston rock scene. This array of hip-shakers includes the iconic original “She Lied,” a thrilling cover of Little Richard’s “The Girl Can’t Help It,” four recently discovered gems making their vinyl debut, and even more sonic onslaughts!

“For a while, right in the middle of the 1960’s, the Rockin’ Ramrods were in total control of the Boston rock scene. Originally recorded for Bon Bon Records, “She Lied” is a truly spectacular piece of proto-punk, the sort of perfect blend of melody and aggression that The Ramones would go on to transform the planet with a dozen or more years later. But this was not some troupe of sociopathic knuckle-draggers, the Rockin’ Ramrods – Bob Henderson, Vin Campisi, Ronn Campisi and Lenny Cirelli – were the sort of group who found themselves gainfully employed playing record hops in local department stores where the entrance fee was the cap from a Coke bottle. And yet, just listen to that track again – buzzsaw guitar, sloppy, slung-lo bass, chanted vocals, The Rockin’ Ramrods are rougher than a badger’s arse, yet beautiful pop at the same time. In 1965 they signed with producer Frank Slay (who’d had hits with doo-wop stars The Rays and would go on to work with Strawberry Alarm Clock) and he began to shape their material. Out went the thrash and in came the shapely pop gems. Trouble is, a million people were making shapely pop gems in 1965, while almost no one was making a thrashy racket. As you’ll hear, the Rockin’ Ramrods were truly punk-before-punk.”

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Various Artists “Garland Records: Pacific Northwest Fuzz Box” (Sundazed)

2019-09-20T04:22:42+00:00September 20th, 2019|

A fuzz-guitar Cascadian cache! The drive’s cranked all the way up and the needle’s fully in the red for this set of uptempo garage-punk stompers from Salem’s enigmatic Garland Records. Packed with killer, crunchy bass, pummeling drums, in-your-face vocals, and (of course) mountains of fuzz-guitar! 13 tracks (primarily originals, with distorted deviations of select known numbers) that range from impossibly rare to previously unreleased.

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Various Artists “Garland Records: Pacific Northwest Stash Box” (Sundazed)

2019-09-20T04:21:52+00:00September 20th, 2019|

From the thriving hotbed of sixties garage and psychedelia of the PNW and Salem’s orphic Garland Records comes this potent cache of rare and previously unreleased recordings. Chiefly composed of moody and mellow folk rockers and ethereal groovers, there are also a few far-out, heady reconstructions of familiar faves. CD includes two bonus cuts not available on the LP. Be warned, these hooks are very sticky!

With Sundazed Music’s acquisition of the Garland Records catalog you’re in for a tidal wave of great garage rock, pysch, soul, and even some country. Here with Pacific Northwest Stash Box, you’re treated to hook laden cuts that sound laced with a little something, and not just “Life Laced Leaf!”

True to form for BeatRocket’s Garland Record collections is the abundance of original material. Out-there originals like “What Goes Up, Must Come Down,” “Parousia,” and “Forest Of Two Trees” sound right at home with the floral covers of “Cathy’s Clown” (Everly Brothers) and “She’d Rather Be With Me” (The Turtles). Sixties Salem Oregon was way out and BeatRocket is sorting through the Garland reels to prove it!

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Various Artists “Strut My Stuff” (Sundazed)

2019-09-20T04:21:52+00:00September 20th, 2019|

For every successful hit act that cracked the charts in the early 50s to mid 60s, there were thousands of obscure artists exhibiting genuine country numbers free from mainstream oversight. Strut My Stuff rounds up such enigmas as the hectic hillbilly bopper “You’ve Been Honky Tonkin’,” the shotgun-wedding scenario of “My Inlaws Made An Outlaw Out Of Me,” and many more farm-raised rarities!

Country music in the 1950s was a growing market that major labels could not ignore. What was once considered a small sector alongside “race music,” moved into the mainstream with the success of artists like Eddy Arnold (RCA), Hank Williams (MGM), and a later crop emerging in the mid ’50s such as Faron Young (Capitol), Webb Pierce (Decca), and many more. This first wave of artists was a goldmine; they were often covered by major pop names, bringing in extra money on publishing and radio play.

There were thousands of non-hit artists who could only dream of a Capitol or RCA contract being handed to them. So they did the best they could, signing to small independents or even ordering a custom pressing (a service many pressing plants offered where you could send the master recordings, pick a label name, font, and a single color label, and the records would arrive in the mail, kind of like a self-published book) to sell at shows, or to hand to the local radio station in the hope of a local hit. Some of the larger independents would sign an artist but may take publishing credits as part of the deal. This often led to a low reward for the artist, but many were just eager to hold a record of their own.

The quality of this vast landscape of artists who flew under the radar ranged from no hope amateurs to near perfect performers. Without a contract or record executives breathing down their necks, these artists were free to put out an authentic representation to what they were actually performing in various honky tonks or small theaters across the states. This painted a wonderful version of the true nature of what country fans were hearing from their local country music scenes.

Collected here is a cross section of this field. Some of the artists went on to enjoy further success, others gave away or threw out the remaining copies of their records and headed back to the farm, factory, or day job. Here, over half a century later, we open the barn doors, dust off those forgotten platters, bring them to you to play loud and Strut Your Stuff!

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The Litter “Distortions” (Sundazed)

2019-09-20T04:21:51+00:00September 20th, 2019|

Red and black marbled vinyl!

Minneapolis was their home turf. But in the decades that followed, appreciation for Distortions swelled to tidal wave proportions among fans of amped-up, ramped-up, balls-to-the-wall rock ‘n’ roll. Headlined by two red-hot, stone-cold killers, “Action Woman” and “Soul Searchin'”–both penned by producer Warren Kendrick–Distortions is arguably the greatest private-press garage band album of the era.

The Litter formed in 1966 as a merger between two popular Twin Cities combos, the Victors and the Tabs. They quickly established a reputation as the wildest, loudest band on the scene. Bill Strandlof was responsible for the incendiary, feedback-laced guitar work on “Action Woman”–a local hit for the band when released as a single in January 1967–but by the summer he’d been replaced by another fast-fingered guitar slinger, Zippy Caplan. Caplan’s fiery leads helped ignite the remainder of Distortions, including smoking interpretations of the Who’s “Substitute,” the Small Faces’ “Whatcha Gonna Do About It,” an intense reading of “Codine,” and a comprehensive reconstruction-destruction of “I’m A Man.”

Pure, unfiltered ’60s garage rock excitement is just a needle-drop away with this Bob Irwin mastered, Kevin Gray cut, and RTI pressed beauty! A fuzzy garage must have sounding and looking better than ever before!

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Canned Heat “Canned Heat” (Sundazed)

2019-09-20T04:21:51+00:00September 20th, 2019|

Gold vinyl! Canned Heat’s eponymous 1967 debut LP, released shortly after their attention-getting performance at the Monterey International Pop Music Festival, introduced the band’s audacious synthesis of blues tradition and electrified boogie. The 11-song album features raw, fiercely soulful interpretations of material by such blues masters as Howlin’ Wolf, Elmore James, Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters and Sonny Boy Williamson, powered by Wilson and Hite’s contrasting vocal styles and Vestine’s explosive fretwork. The result is one of the most distinctive and dynamic blues-rock recordings of the ’60s, and the album that launched Canned Heat’s five-decade musical journey.

This new vinyl edition of this landmark debut effort has been sourced from the original mono masters and pressed on 180-gram vinyl, and features a meticulous reproduction of the LP’s original cover art.

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Dick Dale and His Del-Tones “Surfers’ Choice” (Sundazed)

2019-09-20T04:21:51+00:00September 20th, 2019|

The one that started it all in 1962! On his debut album, Dick Dale managed to capture on tape the ferocious surf sound he was creating for over-the-top audiences at the Rendezvous Ballroom. Songs like “Let’s Go Trippin’,” “Miserlu Twist” and “Surf Beat” helped define the surf genre and send untold aspiring guitarists in search of their own Stratocasters and Fender Showman amps. None of them could match the intensity and directness of Dick’s approach to the instrument. But at least one acolyte, young James “Jimi” Hendrix, did all right for himself in the end. Pick up Surfer’s Choice and hear the sound that launched a musical genre! This Sundazed Music edition of Surfer’s Choice is pressed sourced from the original analog masters.

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Freddy King “Freddy King Goes Surfin'” (Sundazed)

2019-09-06T04:23:39+00:00September 6th, 2019|

Syd Nathan, impresario of Cincinatti’s King Records, was the epitome of the old-school indie record label owner. Always hustling, Nathan regularly beat the odds to release hit after hit in multiple genres. He’d try anything if he thought it might work, or more precisely, if he thought it would make money. After Chess Records turned down guitarist/vocalist Freddy King several times for sounding too much like B.B, King, Nathan thought that sound might actually be sellable and took a chance, signing Freddy to his Federal subsidiary label. They hit paydirt with an instrumental titled “Hide Away,” which reached #5 on the R&B Chart and #29 on the Pop Singles Chart. Encouraged by the single’s success, Nathan released a full album of King’s instrumentals, Let’s Hide Away and Dance Away with Freddy King. (See what Nathan did there with the title, slipping in a reference to Freddy’s big hit single? Always be closing, my friends, always be closing.)The album sold well and helped make Freddy a bankable touring act. While others would have been satisfied to move on to the next project, Syd sensed untapped potential in the LP. Meanwhile, several artists on the West Coast were making noise in the brand new surf music scene (and by “making noise,” I mean selling records). Syd didn’t have any surf music artists under contract, but he DID have Freddy King. Surely, Syd surmised, if the kid’s went nuts for Dick Dale’s guitar instrumental workouts, they could do the same for Freddy’s. All he needed was a little marketing magic…GET A NEW COVER WITH SOME SURF KIDS! THROW SOME CROWD NOISE OVER TRACKS SO IT SOUNDS ‘LIVE’! CALL IT…ERR…FREDDY KING GOES SURFIN’! PRESS IT AND HAVE IT ON THE SHELVES BY NEXT WEEK!!!!!!!

While it may not have happened EXACTLY like that, King Records did release Freddy King Goes Surfin’, an album containing the very same songs (in precisely the same running order) as Let’s Hide Away…with crowd noise dubbed over the music. Did the ruse work? Though it didn’t sell as well as the original, Freddy King Goes Surfin’ did find an audience. Like Bo Diddley Is a Gunslinger, the album’s title is such a preposterous premise that it surely snagged many buyers on that fact alone. And no amount of ersatz cheering and cocktail glass tinkling could cover up the six-string genius of King and his almighty Texas tone. Need proof? Fellow Lone Star blues maven Billy F. Gibbons picked Freddy King Goes Surfin’ as one of his Top Ten Favorite Blues Albums of All Time. As for Sundazed, we know not to mess with a good thing. Sourced from the original King mono masters and pressed on 180-gram vinyl at Record Technology, Inc. (RTI), we are proud to present Freddy King Goes Surfin’ in its original running order with its original cover art. Somewhere, Syd is chuckling to himself, remembering the time he stole a hit right out from under the Chess brothers…

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Ten Years After “Stonedhenge” (Sundazed)

2019-09-06T04:23:39+00:00September 6th, 2019|

The year of 1969 went into the history of British blues-rock favourites Ten Years After as the one in which they broke through in America at the Woodstock Festival. But it was also the period in which they scored two of their total of four top ten albums in the UK. The first of those charted on 22 February 1969, with a title that you might say captured the mood of the times: Stonedhenge.

TYA had made their recording, and UK chart, debut in 1968 with Undead, an album recorded at the well-known London jazz club Klooks Kleek. For this and the follow-up set, they were paired with the respected Decca producer, and founder of the key British blues label Blue Horizon, Mike Vernon.

His credentials already included some of the most important albums of the British blues-rock boom, such as 1966’s Blues Breakers by John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton, other albums with Mayall and numerous studio projects with Fleetwood Mac, including their self-titled debut and Mr. Wonderful follow-up, both in 1968.

As with Undead, the Stonedhenge set was a showcase for the guitar sorcery of Alvin Lee, within the accomplished framework of Leo Lyons’ bass, Chick Churchill’s keyboards and the drums of Ric Lee. It included both concise pieces such as ‘Sad Song’ and ‘Speed Kills’ and extended workouts such as the eight-minute ‘No Title.’

Where Undead had peaked at No. 26 in the UK in September 1968, Ten Years After’s ever-rising reputation saw Stonedhenge crash into the chart at No. 6, as Diana Ross & the Supremes Join The Temptations continued at No. 1. The TYA album spent three consecutive weeks at No. 6, charting in America on the same day and reaching No. 61 there, as their stock continued to rise. Six months later, they went even higher in the UK chart, to No. 4, with Sssh, then repeated that feat only another seven months on with Cricklewood Green.

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Runaways “Queens of Noise” (Sundazed)

2019-07-18T23:14:44+00:00July 18th, 2019|

Queens of punk glam and noise! Arriving mere months after their initial assault, The Runaways crank up the intensity on their dominant second album, painting stark pictures of teenage rebellion across a stunning set of originals. This final album featuring original vocalist Cherie Currie, Queens Of Noise displays advances in The Runaways’ songwriting and playing while keeping their take-no-prisoners attitude totally intact.

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Runaways “Runaways” (Sundazed)

2019-07-18T23:14:44+00:00July 18th, 2019|

Cherry bombs of icon and influence! After snatching a record deal due to the brute strength of a single rehearsal, The Runaways proceeded to change the face (and gender) of rock and roll with the release of their 1976 debut. Full of tough, snarling tales of misbehavior and anthems of offbeat adolescence, the album established these juvenile idols and remains a source of inspiration for the next generation of rebels. Includes the delectable “Cherry Bomb,” “American Nights,” a venomous VU cover, & so much more!

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The Knickerbockers “Rockin’ With The Knickerbockers” (Sundazed)

2019-03-22T03:33:04+00:00March 22nd, 2019|

xploding from AM radio speakers everywhere in 1965, The Knickerbockers’ “Lies” is a certified ‘60s classic. Much has been made over its sonic similarity to the Beatles, particularly the Lennon-esque lead vocals. True, it is remarkable in that regard but what is often overlooked is just how GREAT the song is in its own right. Written by band members Beau Charles and Buddy Randell, it is a superbly crafted composition that could have been a hit for any number of artists. That the Knickerbockers? ferocious version sounds like it was ripped from the soundtrack to “A Hard Day’s Night” is just gravy. But great as it is, there is so much more to the band?s story than their biggest hit.

Brothers John and Beau Charles formed the band in Bergenfield, New Jersey in 1962. Bobby played bass, Beau played guitar and they both sang. They moved through various group personnel, eventually solidifying the lineup with vocalist/saxophonist Bobby Randell and drummer Jimmy Walker. Both of the new recruits already had recording experience, Randall with the Royal Teens (“Short Shorts”) and Walker with The Castle Kings (“You Can Get Him Frankenstein”). Together, the quartet forged their sound as they filled the dance floors on the tough east coast club circuit. While playing the University Twist Palace in Albany, New York, they were spotted by producer and artist Jerry Fuller, who subsequently signed them to Challenge Records in Hollywood.

Sadly, they soon encountered more hurdles. Jimmy Walker left the band in late 1967 to replace Bill Medley in the Righteous Brothers and Challenge Records went out of business soon thereafter. The group carried on for a while with replacement members but disbanded in 1972. Thankfully, Sundazed went straight to the original Challenge analog mono masters and compiled Rockin’ With the Knickerbockers. This amazing album is a true celebration of one of the most criminally underrated groups of all time. Loaded with their best singles and album cuts, it’s rockin’ from beginning to end!

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Sun Ra “Pathways To Unknown Worlds” (Sundazed)

2019-02-22T03:10:11+00:00February 22nd, 2019|

Travelogue through a cybernetical soundscape! The future rendered here by Ra seems more dystopian than utopian, and these 1975 guided improvisations are imbued with an underlying violence, alternate twists, bank turns, headchoppers, loops, rolls, sidewinders and drops. It’s a dark & glorious journey. Featuring the debut of the complete version of “Extension Out,” Pathways has been exquisitely mastered from the four-track session reel!

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