Latin

Robson Jorge & Lincoln Olivetti “Robson Jorge & Lincoln Olivetti ” (Mr Bongo)

2018-03-16T21:25:22+00:00March 11th, 2018|

Razor-sharp production of the highest order from two of the masters of the early 80’s Rio de Janeiro boogie sound, Robson Jorge and Lincoln Olivetti.

Both were highly acclaimed music producers of the time, starting around the mid-70’s. Over the course of his career Olivetti worked with artists including Rita Lee, Erasmo Carlos, Don Beto, Marcos Valle, Tim Maia, Gilberto Gil, Gal Costa, Sandra Sa, Painel de Controle and many more.

The album takes in mid-tempo, AOR, boogie and even latin all way through the tempo’s to ultra-quick Prince style disco-funk workouts. Includes several standout tracks – ‘Aleluia’ and ’Ginga’ being our two favourites. Synths, horns, claps, drum machines, guitars, keys and vocal harmonies combine effortlessly.

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Banda Black Rio “Maria Fumaca” (Mr Bongo)

2018-03-16T21:25:32+00:00March 11th, 2018|

Banda Black Rio’s ‘Maria Fumaca’ is one of the strongest Brazilian samba-disco-funk-soul-fusion albums of all time. As regularly played by Theo Parrish, Gilles Peterson and co.

Banda Black Rio were formed in 1976 by the late Oberdan Magalhães in Rio de Janeiro. They revolutionized ‘black instrumental music’ at the time with their Brazilian re-interpretation of soul, jazz, funk and disco grooves, inspired by the likes of Tim Maia and reminiscent of Kool & The Gang and Earth Wind & Fire during their most on-point period of the 1970’s. ‘Maria Fumaca’ is the groups first album, originally released by Atlantic in 1977; a record that bought the group worldwide fame.

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Dr.Lonnie Smith “Afrodesia” (Groove Merchant)

2018-01-21T01:44:52+00:00January 21st, 2018|

Afrodesia expands upon the soul-jazz sensibility of organist Lonnie Smith‘s classic Blue Note efforts, abandoning their hairpin-tight, diamond-sharp grooves in favor of more meditative, free-flowing epics that draw on elements of Latin jazz, pop, and even disco. Featuring a supporting cast including then-unknown saxophonist Joe Lovano, electric bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Jamey Huddad, Afrodesia features some of Smith‘s strongest, most nuanced work; the imaginative arrangements create panoramic stretches of space for all of the players to explore, and they push the 15-minute “Spirits Free” into compelling new spheres of funk consciousness.

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A Bolha “Um Passo a Frente” (Lion Productions)

2017-10-15T01:44:52+00:00October 15th, 2017|

After venturing from Brazil to England to attend the Isle of Wight Festival, Brazilian band the Bubbles—the toast of the underground Rio de Janeiro scene, who had backed Tropicalist singer Gal Costa’s residence at the Sucata night club in that epochal year of 1970—decided to experiment with a heavier sound than that of their Brazilian cohorts. Step one, they changed their name to A Bolha. Then, loaded with verve and swagger (and fueled by drugs), they recorded their first album, which has secured a permanent place as one of the best rock/psych albums to ever emerge from South America. That album, “Um Passo a frente” (A Step Forward), was released in 1973 by the Continental label, in a gatefold cover which was quite luxurious for the era. This masterpiece, now impossibly hard to find as an original, made a name for A Bolha in the pantheon of 1970’s Brazilian rock. But success in the early 1970’s was not like it had been in the Tropicalia days, when even weird bands like Os Mutantes had weekly TV gigs to help them become well-known nationwide—and eventually, worldwide.

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Gal Costa “India” (Mr Bongo)

2018-03-12T00:00:30+00:00September 10th, 2017|

Official Mr Bongo reissue – gatefold LP with insert. Replica original artwork. Mastered from original tapes. A post-Tropicalia masterpiece from one of the movements key figures and true legends of Brazilian music, Gal Costa. Features a stellar line up of musicians including Gilberto Gil, Arthur Verocai, Dominguinhos, Rogério Duprat and Tenorio Jr. amongst others. Replica original gatefold including the cover that was banned by the Brazilian military government in 1973 during the brutal dictatorship. ‘India’ includes the incredible ’Pontos De Luz’ as sampled by Kaytranada on ’Lite Spots’ – one of our favourite Brazilian songs of all time. A wonderful album from start to finish, touching on MPB, folk, jazz, funk and rock with strong Tropicalia and Nordestino influences throughout.

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Orchestra Soledad “Vamonos / Let’s Go” (BBE)

2018-02-25T21:04:01+00:00June 25th, 2017|

Resurrected on vinyl some forty-seven years after its original release, Vamonos/Let’s Go is the debut and only offering created by Brooklyn salsa outfit The Orchestra Soledad. Containing quaint hits such as I’ll Make You A Queen and La Puerta Esta, this niche record is one of histories forgotten and hidden gems.

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California Playboys “Trying To Become A Millionaire” (Manufactured)

2017-05-20T23:20:08+00:00May 20th, 2017|

In the early 1970s, the collective known as The California Playboys was the backing band for R&B singer Lester Young (not to be confused with the jazz saxophonist of same name) on a series of singles, before recording their sole album under their own name, Trying To Become A Millionaire.

The instrumental precision of Trying To Become A Millionaire is immediately evident; clearly the product of a group of seasoned session musicians. Incorporating Latin music elements, pre-disco rhythms, bouncy funk bass lines and seamlessly clean guitar, the album calls to mind the music of Donald Byrd, Roy Ayers and Bobbi Humphrey. Depending on the track, the vocal delivery is at times reminiscent of Bobby Womack, Donny Hathaway or even Marvin Gaye, but all provide a complimentary gravity and substance to the flawless instrumentals.

The album was never repressed or reissued since its initial run on the San Francisco-based label Loadstone in 1976. As a result, it has become incredibly sought-after in the ensuing years. Original vinyl copies, when they even appear, have been known to sell for $1,000 or more among collectors. For the first time in nearly 40 years, Manufactured Recordings is proud to present this highly coveted soul treasure on CD to a new audience of fans.

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Tim Maia “1973” (Oficial Arquivos)

2017-03-25T22:27:00+00:00March 25th, 2017|

The fourth studio album from legendary singer and composer Tim Maia is a masterpiece of soulful pop and contemporary Brazilian styles, exemplified by the hit ‘Gostavo Tanto De Você’ and the gorgeous English-language ‘Over Again,’ a gem of sunshine soul. The influence of Memphis is evident in the Booker T-esque instrumental ‘Amores’ and the swamp funk of ‘Do Your Thing, Behave Yourself’ and ‘Balanço,’ while the timeless classic ‘Réu Confesso’ showcases Maia’s songwriting skills in a samba-soul standard.

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Tim Maia “1970” (Oficial Arquivos)

2017-10-01T19:57:58+00:00March 25th, 2017|

The first studio album by legendary singer and composer Tim Maia, picked by Rolling Stone Brazil as one of the top 25 greatest Brazilian albums of all time, changed the game by seamlessly combining popular Brazilian music, MPB, with the brassy soul sound associated with Memphis. In addition to Maia classics ‘Azul Da Cor Du Mar,’ ‘Coroné Antonio Bento,’ and ‘Primavera,’ highlights include the funk-meets-baião ‘Padre Cicero’ and the soulful ‘Cristina.’

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Jorge Ben “Tropical” (Oficial Arquivos)

2017-03-25T21:57:10+00:00March 25th, 2017|

One of Brazil’s greatest songwriters, Jorge Ben rarely dwelled on any particular musical style, even the ones he helped create. By the mid 1970s, Ben had already innovated several groundbreaking new twists on the classic samba sound, in the process creating many tunes that became epoch-defining hits for South America’s biggest country — not to mention the world at large. For 1977’s Tropical, he made the controversial decision to rework an album’s worth of his most beloved songs in the new, disco and funk influenced Afro-Samba style he was exploring at the time. As a result, classics like ‘Chove Chuva,’ ‘Taj Mahal,’ and ‘Mas Que Nada’ get polished updates, alongside deeper rarities like ‘Georgia’and ‘Jesus de Praga,’ making Tropical a sensual, sultry counterpoint to other Jorge Ben collections.

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Fabiano Do Nascimento “Tempo Dos Mestres” (Now Again)

2017-03-25T20:09:36+00:00March 25th, 2017|

Tempo dos Mestres (Time of the Masters) is the second album from the tireless, young Brasilian guitarist Fabiano Do Nascimento. It finds its roots in the depths of the Amazon rain forest, passed down through generations of Native Brasilians, and is imbibed by the Afro-Brasilian culture that arose after Portuguese colonization. It is the third Brasilian album released on Now-Again, following Seu Jorge and Almaz and Do Nascimento’s debut Dança dos Tempos. Do Nascimento’s is joined on Tempo dos Mestres by his long time percussionist, Ricardo “Tiki” Pasillas on trap drums and percussion, and Sam Gendel on saxophone and flute. Vocals are performed by Thalma de Freitas and Carla Hasset.

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Daniel Grau “Disco Fantasy” (Oom Dooby Dochas)

2016-10-05T01:53:13+00:00October 5th, 2016|

Oom Dooby Dochas present a reissue of Daniel Grau’s Disco Fantasy, originally released in 1979. This 1979 release was the fourth solo effort of Venezuelan composer and musician Daniel Grau. Disco-funk with a Latin melody and rhythm approach surely was the hottest thing among the dancing folks back in the day and the rather futuristic synthesizer arrangements turn these memorable tunes into a spacey and spicy affair. The sound is perfect and the performance equals its package. The compositions are quite long all-in-all, giving it a hypnotic effect on the listener and dancer. The continuing, pulsating groove comes in a repetitive manner creating a floating atmosphere. Disco Fantasy is surely a product of its era and made for disco lovers to dance on through the simmering nights, but unlike most mainstream disco albums this record opens the gate to another dimension touching the senses of everybody in reach when it gets played on the turntable. Next to the similar massive Donna Summer works like “I Feel Love”, this is the true essence of disco music – entirely instrumental with an emphasis on synthesizer melodies instead of vocals. Drift away into your disco fantasy.

Big John Patton “Let’em Roll” (Blue Note)

2016-05-13T00:48:33+00:00May 13th, 2016|

In an unusual setting for a groove/soul jazz setting, B3 organist extraordinaire big John Patton creates a band around himself that includes Grant Green, drummer Otis Finch, and vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson. It’s truly weird to think of vibes on a groove date, but the way Patton’s understated playing works, and the way Green is literally all things to all players, Hutcherson’s role is not only a clearly defined one, but adds immeasurably to both depth and texture on this date. What also makes this possible is the symbiotic relationship between Patton and Green. There is a double groove conscious swing happening on every track here, from the bluesed-out slip and slide of the title track which opens the record to a killer version of Hank Mobley’s “The Turnaround,” which expands the blues vibe into solid soul territory because of Hutcherson’s ability to play pianistically and slip into the funk groove whenever necessary. Green’s deadly in his solo on the track, shimmering arpeggios through Patton’s big fat chords and chunky hammering runs. Also notable are Patton’s own tunes, the most beautiful of which is “Latona,” a floating Latin number with a killer salsa rhythm in 6/8. As Patton vamps through the chorus, Green slips in one of his gnarliest solos ever. It begins with a groove like run in the hard bop blues and then shoves itself into overdrive, capturing the cold sweat of a Bola Sete or Wes Montgomery in his groove years. But when Green goes for the harmonic edges, all bets are off: Hutcherson lays out, and he and Patton go running to the bridge and bring the melody back just in time to take it out. This is one of the least appreciated of Patton’s records, and there’s no reason for it; it is great.

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