Charles Maurice

Charles Maurice “French Disco Boogie Sounds Vol. 4 1977-1991” (Favorite)

2020-01-23T21:28:10+00:00January 23rd, 2020|

Double LP version. Gatefold sleeve. The motor hasn’t had time to cool down and the belt drive is feeling the fatigue. But Charles Maurice is the kind of DJ who just can’t let a turntable rest. After steaming up the slipmat with three sexy compilations of French Boogie, Charles Maurice is back with Volume 4. In the late ’70s and early ’80s, while France was still firmly tuned into variety-show pop, a few enlightened ears and souls picked up the hypnotic beat of funk from across the Atlantic. These first warrior monks spread the good word in discotheques, jumped on newly available frequencies to fill the airwaves and — in some cases — took up instruments themselves to unabashedly build on the U.S. model. In a short decade stretching from the late ’70s to the late ’80s — just a blip on the scale of music history — they turned out material in abundance. Lush productions with colorful covers, groovy typeface, and creative photo shoots, but first and foremost, they made music weaned on, spoon-fed and imbued with funk. Music defined by a groove with a robotic beat (Djeneba) that clearly hears hip-hop banging on the door, where layers of synthesizers, handclaps (Eric Chotteau), horns, and African percussion line up and follow the all-powerful lead of the swelling slap bass (Cyrill). This is music that tells everyday stories, both humorous and lovelorn (Serge Delisle), often packed with pheromones just waiting to be released on the dance floor or sofa (Chris O’Hara). Shaped by synthetic textures, these productions are also spiced with Caribbean and Creole arrangements that reflect the West Indies’ critical contribution to French Boogie (Wai Kop, Acayouman). With his immaculate tailoring, slicked-back hair and clipped moustache, Maurice has once again transformed himself into a hi-fi stylus to explore the groove traced by this specifically French musical style. From 45 to 33 rpm, he has traveled the black spiral to bring a new selection that proudly features a number of rarely-heard pieces and even an unreleased track by Marco Attali. True to form, Monsieur Charles carefully crafted this fourth volume from his personal collection of impeccably restored and mastered vinyl recordings. Charles Maurice: where French elegance meets uncompromising musical taste. Also features: Dwight Druick, David Simon, Shen Et Les Shendys, and Aries.

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Charles Maurice “AOR Global Sounds 1977-1986 Volume 4” (Favorite)

2019-03-22T03:33:26+00:00March 22nd, 2019|

Double LP version. Gatefold sleeve. Favorite Recordings and Charles Maurice present the fourth edition of the AOR Global Sounds compilation series: 14 rare and hidden tracks, produced between 1977 and 1986 in various parts of the world. Started in 2015, the AOR Global Sounds series was born from the will of Charles Maurice (aka Pascal Rioux) to share his longtime love for the AOR and west coast movement and highlight its influence for many artists in the late ’70s and early ’80s. In this fourth volume, he again selected largely forgotten productions, deeply infused with disco and soul flavors. Half of the compilation’s track list naturally comes from the US, homeland of this style of music, but the other half is made of productions from all over the globe, from France to Belgium, from Italy to Mexico. And for most of these beautiful songs, it comes from artists and bands largely unknown and often released as private press. As an example, “Come Back” is the result of a music talent competition won by a student band named Parenthèse, gaining a full recording session in a professional studio and the production of a limited promotional 7″, which stayed completely obscure until now. “Mellow Out” comes from the only album by Pacific Dreams, which was fully self-produced and released by its leader Tommy Sweet. Fernando Toussaint, however, had quite a solid career and discography as a drummer, forming the Mexican jazz-funk band Sacbé with his brother, and had one solo album released in very limited quantities on Discos Alebrije, a label directed by Alain Derbez. As for “Never Was Love” by Russ Long, despite becoming quite famous when recorded and sang by Judy Roberts, it’s still surprisingly undiscovered in its original version, taken from Russ’ beautiful album from 1982, Long On Jazz In Kansas City. There are stories like this for each of the titles included in AOR Global Sounds Volume 4, but the best way to learn more about all these gems is to listen to them, fully remastered from originals, whether your preference is for vinyl or CD. Also features: Arlana, Omega Sunrise, Jonathan Jr., Isabelle Mayereau, Oro, Todd Mcclenathan, Mario Acquaviva, Special Occasion, Miller, Miller, Miller & Sloan and Scott Cunningham.

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